Back to All Events

Taste of Tai Chi w/ Beth Staenberg

This six week workshop will meet at 1:15 each Monday beginning 9/14 building each week.
Join us for a better understanding of Tai Chi warm ups, cool downs, and breath work. 
 

Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese martial art involving slow and continuous movements that incorporate unilateral and bilateral weight shift, trunk and extremity rotation.This ancient system of exercise focuses on loosening the joints and spine to relax points of tension in the body. It is conventionally thought that perserverance in practicing Tai Chi can regulate the flow of qi ( energy) in the body and help strengthen one's health. Tai Chi is often described as a 'moving meditation' because its slow, turning motions relieve stress, improve circulation, and help create a sense of peacefulness.

The Tai Chi which will be taught is Tai Chi: moving for better balance. This is an evidenced based training modality of balance, stimulating the musculoskeletal, sensory and cognitive systems via self-initiated, controlled movements including unliteral weight shifts and weight bearing motions, trunk rotation, ankle sways, and coordinated eye-hand-head motions. The goal of these exercises is to improve both static and dynamic postural stability, mindful control of body positioning in space, functional walking patterns, movement symmetry and coordination, range of motion and strength of lower extremities. It emphasis is on low impact movements.

In summary of the above, Moving for better Balance Tai Chi adheres to the fundamental principles of traditional Tai Chi Chuan which include: weight bearing and non weight bearing stances, good body alignment and coordinated movements conducted in a continuous, circular and flowing motion.

Tai Chi is low impact, slow motion exercise. You breathe deeply and naturally focusing your attention on your bodily sensations. Tai Chi differs from other types of exercise as movements are typically circular and never forced, muscles are relaxed rather than tensed, joints are not fully extended or bent, connective tissue is not stretched. Tai Chi can be adapted for anyone from the most fit to people confined to wheel chairs or recovering from surgery. A lot of research suggests that Tai Chi is an important adjunct to standard medical treatment for the prevention and rehabilitation of many conditions commonly associated with age. Tai Chi can work with improving a person's functioning and quality of life.

Earlier Event: July 31
KYO Student Appreciation Cookout
Later Event: September 21
Taste of Tai Chi w/ Beth Staenberg