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15761 W Dodge Road
Omaha, NE, 68118
USA

4026792114

Est. 2013

Head yoga instructor, Lisa Kanne has been teaching yoga for over 10 years.

New studio with familiar faces.

Teacher Blog

Fall is here and your skin may be telling you so, if you feel drier, itchy or otherwise off it is time for an Ayurvedic Facial. 

Vata Season is settling in and our natural response to this is dryness - both internally and externally, it is vitally important to lubricate through our diets adding good oils, ghee (clarified butter) and cooked foods that are comforting and nourishing and massaging good quality oils into our skin. One tip I share with my Ayurvedic clients is to shut the shower off and immediately massage oil into the skin before toweling off, less oil is required and the skin benefits greatly from being warm, the oil able to absorb deeper into the tissue. They say self massage invokes the inner pharmacy and is anti-aging, I say it is well worth the small amount of time this might take to add to your daily routine.

Gaby Van Houten

Ayurvedic Health Practitioner

Pancha Karma Specialist

Licensed Esthetician


Book your Ayurvedic Facial now and claim your Free 1oz massage oil while supplies last. Your skin will thank you. Call 402-614-2244 or

https://my.timedriver.com/9TVKK

Happy New You! When we go solo...

Lisa Kanne

Good morning and happy New Year! 

 

Let’s take on 2017 with a fresh and open mind. As the year begins we set intentions of things we can do better, better for ourselves or for others. We can commit to big or small things, below you’ll find two articles, one discussion societal change and how Yoga can change the world. Following this is an article titled How Yoga Fosters Real Community + Relationships in a Digital World, discussing how to build community and specifically one centered on a yogic practice. If you’re trying to make a change in your life whether that be starting or revitalizing your own yoga practice or becoming apart of the community, feel free to reach out to Karma Yoga Omaha. 

 

Take what you will from the information below and as you move forward, walk with a more open heart. 

 

Namaste 

 

Camile Messerley 

http://www.yogajournal.com/yoga-101/proof-yoga-can-change-world/ 

 

Article No. 1 

Proof that Things Can Change 

 

 

 

I’m reminded of the football player who bullied me when I came out as a gay 17-year-old in a small Ohio town in 1996. I’d see his face in my high school hallway and my heart would sink, knowing I was about to be called names, pushed into the wall, and then left to pick up my scattered books and papers. A few years ago, he contacted me on social media and memories of his abuse surfaced. I didn’t want to hear what he had to say, but something within told me to listen. He told me a beautiful story of how his heart opened after he met a 

girl who’d been faced with homelessness until a gay couple invited her into their home, parenting her through her teenage years. He told me if it weren’t for their generosity, he probably wouldn’t be married to her today. He went on to apologize for how he had treated me in high school and shared that regret still haunted him. His heart had changed. Last month, I wrote my own coming out story for YogaJournal.com in celebration of LGBT History Month. One of the most difficult things I’ve ever written, it required facing my past trauma and detailing both the positive and brutal aspects of my journey. I hoped my story may help and inspire others to be their authentic selves and know they aren’t alone. 

I learned this past week that through mutual a friend on social media, my story had found its way into the hands of a parent of two—a 7-year-old transgender child and a daughter in high school. The older sister had been working on plans to start a Gay-Straight Alliance in her high school to ensure that when her brother gets there, he is part of a caring and accepting community. Her school administrators, who were initially resistant to the idea, agreed to work with her on the project once they read the YogaJournal.com article. Their minds changed. 

 

When I heard this story, I couldn’t help but feel an overwhelming sense of pride. My friend added, “Keep doing the wonderful work because the two of you are doing (dare I say it?) God’s work and literally changing the world for the better.” 

 

4 Ways Yogis Really Can Change the World 

Changing the world for the better—it’s what so many of us as yoga teachers and practitioners yearn to do and are accomplishing whether we realize it or not. During times of chaos and turbulence, we search for ways to make sense of the world and are often left with more questions than answers. In the book, Upside, Jim Rendon shows how the suffering caused by traumatic events can become a force for dramatic life change, moving people to find deeper meaning in their lives and driving them to help themselves and others. If you’re not sure where to start, here are 4 simple steps, we, as yogis, can take every day to change the world. 

 

 

1. Approach everyone with the spirit of “Namaste.” 

The day after the Orlando shootings at Pulse Nightclub, my partner and I were faced with teaching yoga at Kaleidoscope Youth Center and offering space for the youth to share what they were thinking and feeling. Some expressed fear and uncertainty, while a few offered hope for change. They reminded us how each of our classes together ends by saying, “Namaste, the light, love, and energy inside of me salutes, honors, and bows down to the light, love, and energy inside of you.” How we can take this off our mats and into the world? The kids simplified the statement by saying, “Just be kind and treat everyone how you want to be treated.” See the beauty in others, see their divine energy, see the life that’s alive in them and connect with it. 

 

2. Be a peacemaker. 

We can be united or divided. It’s a choice and humanity’s duty to use our intellect in combination with our heart to bring peace. While one gunman can change the lives of thousands of people with evil, one yogi can change the lives of thousands with compassion. This is a powerful truth often forgotten in times of turmoil. But through our actions and 

speech, we can hurt or heal, create suffering or joy, and close or open doors. As the song goes, “Let there be peace on Earth, and let it begin with me.” 

3. Be generous with your gifts and talents. 

Change is possible and it starts with you. Know that you maintain within you the power and gifts to start the radical change you want to see in the world. In the words of Buddha, “Teach this simple truth to all: A generous heart, kind speech, and a life of service and compassion are the things which renew humanity.” Gandhi invited us to “be the change that [we] wish to see in the world.” You may not see immediate results, but rest assured that everywhere you go, you are planting your own seeds of change by being your own vibrant and authentic self. 

What is your gift and what are you willing to offer of yourself to a world that is hurting? Find what makes you come alive, and then do that. The world needs more people who have come alive and are willing to share their strengths. 

 

4. Keep using yoga’s tools to stay on this path. 

The breath practices, meditations, and postures of yoga offer benefits that both teachers and students carry with them out of the studio and into the world. The following breath practice, inspired by Jean Hall’s book Breathe: Simple Breathing Techniques for a Calmer, Happier Life, is a prime example. It is gentle and simple but deeply effective to balance the actions from the head and heart. 

A Practice to Unify Breath, Heart, and Mind 

Start by finding a comfortable seat. Softly lengthen up through your spine. Invite the chest to open and the shoulders to relax. Gently close your eyes and allow your facial muscles to soften. 

Place your right hand on your lower belly and become aware of your breath as you feel your belly gently expanding into your palm on each inhale and receding as you exhale. 

Now rest your left hand on your heart. Feel its beat in your palm and listen to its rhythm. Soften your breath and begin to breathe in time with the beat of your heart. Inhale for 5 beats, pause for one beat, exhale for 6 beats, and pause for one beat. 

Remain here for 5–10 minutes, enjoying the synchronicity between your heart and your breath. As you release the practice, begin to think of ways you can change the world. Portions of this piece are adapted from a post originally published on the Yoga on High blog. 

About the author 

 

Daniel Sernicola teaches yoga in Columbus, Ohio, with his partner, Jake Hays. Both are committed to the empowerment of their students and specialize in creating compassionate, safe, and inclusive yoga environments. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.yogajournal.com/article/lifestyle/yoga-fosters-community-relationships/ 

 

Article No. 2 

How Yoga Fosters Real Community + Relationships in a Digital World 

 

 

 

Spending quality time with family, friends, and community—while also staying open to new relationships—is the secret to a happy, healthy life. One of the most powerful ways to forge more vital, lasting connections: yoga. 

Take a walk through any public space, and you’ll spot more than a few people moving about as if they’re in a trance, staring down at their smartphones while weaving through the crowd, or mind-melding with their digital tablets as they shop, dine, or ride the train. All too often, contact with others is taking place over text, Skype, or email—not face-to-face. It’s a dramatic shift from the way things were just a few decades ago. For example, a 1987 University of California, Los Angeles survey found that almost 40 percent of the school’s freshmen spent 16 hours or more per week socializing with others in person; today, just 18 percent of UCLA’s freshmen devote the same amount of time to doing so. Digital communication has, for many, become a default mode, while hanging out “IRL” seems like a throwback—a trend that’s a bit worrisome when you consider that getting together with pals has significant benefits for our health and well-being. 

 

Strong, broad-based social support (the kind you tend to develop via in-person interactions) increases your odds of living longer by 91 percent, according to a review of 148 studies conducted by researchers at Brigham Young University. Close connections also have a proven impact on survival or quality of life for people facing health issues like cancer, 

stroke, dementia, depression, and diabetes. Being embedded in a community is biologically reassuring, experts theorize; it confers a protective effect that actually seems to boost immunity and fights stress and inflammation. 

“Intimacy is healing,” agrees Dean Ornish, MD, president and founder of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute (PMRI) in Sausalito, California. He adds that there’s “something really powerful” in being able to share your authentic self with others, instead of just a carefully curated Facebook profile or Instagram snapshot. In his work at PMRI, Ornish helps facilitate social intimacy for people with heart disease using “love-based interventions”—sessions that combine support-group meetings and yoga and meditation classes with healthy meals and workouts. He typically has patients practice yoga before they get together in their support groups, which encourages more meaningful conversation during the meetings. “At the end of a yoga and meditation class, you’re feeling more peaceful, which helps you access your feelings and express them without fear of being judged,” Ornish explains. 

 

Forging significant connections without such guidance can be a little tougher, but it’s absolutely possible. Harvard University’s Study of Adult Development, which tracked the lives of 724 men for up to 76 years, offers insight into what can happen to an individual’s personal habits over time. Encouragingly, the study reveals, it’s never too late to change course. People can and do rewrite their life scripts midstream, intensifying ties with family, friends, and acquaintances—and that can bring physical and emotional rewards. You don’t need a whole village around you to reap the benefits, either: “Any community can be healing, whether it’s one other person or 1oo,” notes Ornish. “It’s really about sharing your experiences with others.” 

 

For yoga lovers, your mat may be the easiest, most natural place to start. Whether you practice alone or in a group setting, yoga can help you meet and bond with people who share your aspirations, interests, and perspective on life. As you embrace your passion, you also open up to connecting with those in your life, acknowledging your common humanity and intensifying your capacity for joy. Why not use this great tool to create the relationships you crave? Whether you want to begin new friendships, strengthen existing ties with loved ones, or serve strangers through seva (selfless service), yoga can provide an assist. Here, four powerful ways yoga can help us all connect. 

 

Yoga primes you to make new friends. 

It’s surprising how often we unconsciously prevent ourselves from meeting people who might be important to us. We get caught up in our own personal dramas, memories of past slights, and lingering worries, which clouds our ability to see that others are yearning for connection. Yoga helps clear away the cobwebs of past experience; it opens our eyes to the present and transforms our point of view. “Yoga positively impacts your mood, psychological functioning, and focus,” says Angela Wilson, a faculty member at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, who’s long studied yoga’s salutary effects. “You feel better mentally, more ready to go out into the world and make friends.” 

 

In 2014, Wilson joined a team of researchers convened by Kripalu to examine exactly how this happens. In the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, they explained that yoga operates on multiple levels—through asana, pranayama, meditation, and philosophy—to keep our minds 

and bodies in peak condition, which can make engaging with those around us easier. Some studies, they added, suggest that yoga further optimizes the workings of the vagus nerve, a bundle of fibers that extends from the top of the spine through the respiratory system and GI tract and that affects your heart rate, breathing, and other physical processes. As your yoga practice grows, you may see improvements in sleep and digestion and find that you’re more adept at regulating stress, controlling emotion, and directing attention. 

“We see self-regulation as really key to social functioning,” says Wilson. “People who feel imbalanced or anxious may deliberately isolate themselves because it’s unpleasant for them to be social; they feel their interactions won’t be as successful. But if you’re able to regulate yourself, you’re more likely to reach out.” 

When stress mounts, taking a moment to breathe and tune in to what you’re feeling, as you would in yoga class, can prevent irritability, stave off conflict, and promote harmony. In fact, mindful breathing may be your best tool in tough situations, since it activates areas in the brain’s frontal lobes that heighten calm and concentration. “It’s like putting on an emotional sling,” offers neuroscientist Andrew Newberg, MD, director of research at the Myrna Brind Center of Integrative Medicine in Philadelphia and co-author of How Enlightenment Changes Your Brain. And practicing yoga and pranayama regularly over time can make you more responsive to your environment and the people in it. You may not only feel more alive and enthusiastic, but also be better able to go with the flow, which will buoy you in social situations. 

 

Try it 

Scientific studies indicate that to keep your nervous system balanced, short, frequent bursts of yoga are better than longer but less-frequent sessions. To fight anxiety and better connect with others, aim for 10 to 30 minutes per day of yoga, experts suggest. And to put yourself in a more relaxed frame of mind before a first date or any big social event, at least 60 minutes prior try to fit in a restorative yoga class—or any class emphasizing slow, deep, conscious breathing. 

 

Yoga strengthens your existing ties with friends and family. 

One of the most awe-inspiring aspects of yoga is the way in which it nudges you toward greater discovery—not only by making visible previously hidden aspects of your own character, but also by illuminating areas of your relationships that could be explored and further strengthened. 

 

Yoga starts by asking you to be fully present, a skill that’s a boon for relationships, says Kate Feldman, co-director of the Conscious Relationships Institute in Hesperus, Colorado. “Most people are so busy that to simply be, to look at each other, to listen carefully, takes focus they don’t normally have,” she says. “We ask our clients to put their phones away, to stretch, to breathe. The natural effect of the practice leads your heart to open and makes you more available to connection.” \ 

 

Your body also divulges a wisdom when you’re doing yoga, which can come in handy when dealing with challenges later on, says James Murphy, director of the Iyengar Yoga Association of Greater New York. “The next time you’re in a yoga class, consider: What happens when you bend your leg this way, or that? Are you being too aggressive? Are you creating resistance? Are you giving enough?” In your daily life, ask yourself similar questions 

when a conversation becomes difficult or heated. Checking in with yourself like this can help you navigate conflict and reset conversations. It makes you more thoughtful, less reactive. 

Inviting loved ones to practice yoga with you could trigger further breakthroughs. In her counseling work, Feldman asks clients to perform tandem poses. “They always laugh and say: ‘Oh, my knees!’ or, ‘Oh, my hamstrings!’ But their heart rates go down—and afterward they hug on impulse,” she says. 

 

Try it 

Promote the flow of positive energy in your relationships with this exercise from Elysabeth Williamson, founder of Principle-Based Partner Yoga in Santa Barbara, California. Sit in a quiet place and rub your hands together in front of your heart. Feel the heart energy growing in your hands, and then slowly draw them apart—they should be tingly and magnetic. Tune in to the sensation, basking in its healing power. (To practice as a couple, sit facing each other and turn your warmed palms toward one another.) 

 

Yoga provides you with an instant community of fellow yogis. 

There’s a beautiful moment that frequently occurs at the heart of a big yoga class, when everyone’s listening to the teacher and transitioning through poses in unison. Sinking into that wonderful group energy amplifies feelings of safety and trust; it seems like you’re in a sacred circle, taking part in a great communion. “There’s a sense of, ‘We’re all here doing this together. I’m not an outlier in this world,’” says Robert Jon Waldinger, MD, director of Harvard’s Study of Adult Development. At yoga festivals, retreats, teacher trainings, and even in local classes, there’s a real bond that spreads among a group of yogis who’ve chosen the same type of experience. Murphy sees it happen all the time in his Iyengar classes: “People forge communities. They become friends for life.” 

You can definitely feel that vibe at Bhakti Fest, a yoga and music festival launched in 2oo9 that hosts massive yoga classes, around-the-clock kirtan chanting sessions, and wisdom workshops daily. “We’re building a spiritual community—thousands of people gathered under the same roof, with one intention,” says founder Sridhar Silberfein. “People come out talking about how many friends they’ve made.” 

 

University of Oxford researchers have found another reason yoga in a group may help us connect: When we exercise en masse, they suggest, we feel safer and more supported than when we do so alone. As a result, there may be less pain and fatigue—two biological signifiers of a potential threat. In fact, we actually release higher quantities of endorphins and endocannibinoids, nature’s chemical pain relievers and mood enhancers, into our nervous systems. As a result, we feel better, which rewards our cooperation as a group. “Experiencing this ‘social high’ may bring us closer together,” offers Arran Davis, a cognitive and evolutionary anthropologist at Oxford. 

 

When we engage in a group chant or meditation that induces a feeling of mutual transcendence, the brain literally shrinks its perception of distance between ourselves and others. “In deep spiritual moments, we’ve observed decreased activity in the parietal lobe, which regulates the boundaries between the self and the world,” says neuroscientist Andrew Newberg. “When that activity reduces, people feel a connectedness, an intermingling between their selves and everyone else’s.” 

 

Try it 

Communities used to form naturally, via the companies at which we worked or the religious institutions we attended, Ornish says. These days, we have to be more purposeful about building them. To find a community of your own, strike out and shake things up: Join a yoga circle in your area, check out Yoga Meetups (meetup.com), or make this your year to try a new yoga festival or retreat. 

 

Yoga facilitates exchanges between people of different backgrounds. 

PMRI’s Ornish, who’s studied yoga for 40 years, likes to tell a story about his late friend Sri Swami Satchidananda, the influential founder of Integral Yoga. When Satchidananda opened his New York City studio, the guru asked his students to answer the phone by saying, “Hello—how may I serve you?” “Some of the students said, ‘That sounds so debasing,’” Ornish remembers. “But [Satchidananda] would say, ‘No! When someone gives you the opportunity to serve them, it helps you.’” 

 

Yoga’s call to seva, or service, can nurture a sense of humility, gratitude, and respect that positively impacts relationships. “When we do the work of seva together, we see that we’re interdependent, interconnected,” says Suzanne Sterling, co-founder of the nonprofit Off the Mat Into the World and director of its Global Seva Challenge. Over the past decade, Sterling has led teams that built birthing centers in Uganda, installed water-filtration systems in Ecuador, and created micro-loan programs in Haiti. “We share rituals; we build communities,” she says. 

 

As with any good relationship, you must set aside your ego to be effective in seva. “You must forgo making assumptions about other people,” Sterling explains. “Someone who’s poor and living and farming on the side of a field may be happier than a person who’s isolated in a mansion.” 

Acknowledging others’ truth is critical, agrees Angel Lucia, owner of Bindu Yoga Studio in West Palm Beach, Florida, who has worked on seva projects for 18 years. “People just need to be heard.” she says. “You have to interact with them like a friend.” 

In an important way, seva teaches you to trust yourself—your curiosity, your abilities, your innate positivity. “I have seen people blossom through seva,” says Lucia. “First, they grow comfortable with themselves, then they grow comfortable with others who are different from them.” 

 

Try it 

Identify a cause you feel passionate about, and amass a solid team first; it can include yogis and studios leading similar efforts, or interested friends and family. “You get more done together,” Sterling attests. “When you share power and responsibility, you build real community—and that helps create something sustainable.” Leadership intensives and Yoga in Action groups developed by Off the Mat can connect you with others interested in seva efforts (offthematintotheworld.org). 

 

When to go solo 

 

So what if you want to be alone on occasion? That’s OK, says Robert Jon Waldinger, MD, director of Harvard’s Study of Adult Development. “Some people need a lot of solitude, and it’s good for them,” he says. “One size does not fit all.” While it’s true that the subjective experience of loneliness hastens cognitive and physical decline as you age, that’s only if you feel the absence of others keenly, rather than take pleasure in solitude. 

 

“There’s a difference between loneliness and solitude, scientifically speaking,” adds Alan Teo, MD, assistant professor of psychiatry at Oregon Health & Science University. “If you feel lonely when you’re alone, it’s not healthy. But for people who find it restorative, it can be beneficial.” In a 10-year study of 4,672 adults, Teo and his team discovered that if your interactions with a partner are hurtful or negative, it’s actually better for your mental health to be alone. “It’s the quality of relationships that matters,” he says. 

Teo’s advice? Try to fit some alone time into every day. Even if you like to be around others, there may be diminished benefits to overdoing it. Socializing with any single individual (aside from the ones you live with) more than three times a week isn’t proven to have positive health effects. 

 

Encourage family members to join you in a home practice. It can be a great way to embrace, laugh, and bond with each other.